Axe Profiling

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Axe Profiling

Post by Otter on Sat Sep 24, 2011 8:32 pm

Seeing as people are trying to up the web sites activities, I figured I'd go ahead and post some random bull s*** like I used too to help... that said, enjoy. Also, no actual pictures are here, I'm way to lazy. Or maybe I will until I get tired of doing so.

Axes come in many shapes, forms, and sizes. Too start with, we are concentrating on the profiles of American axes.



Random note: This type of axe is a Snow and Nealley, a vintage Maine made axe, and this profile is known as the "Maine" axe among the learned. When new its a bit longer, but see how thick it is? Maine axe.

This is a American axe, one that I'm restoring right now. See how the blade is like a triangle around the eye (handle) of axe? European axes are like ---0 with no poll or transition to the eye. Poll is the back part of a axe, and in American axes are essential to balance it, thereby reducing fatigue. A 6 pound balanced axe is easier to work than a 2.5 unbalanced axe.



This is another type of American axe you will see, it has convexed edges instead of flat, like above. Don't ask me why, I seriously have no clue. If you know, please share. Now what you will note with this last picture of mine is how thick the blade is (which I have since changed). It was more like a splitting maul. The thinner the blade, the better it will chop. Which is why European axes ( ---0 ) used to be so popular. However, they sucked at splitting due to no transition to the eye, which is why the American axe has been so popular in the past hundred years. No matter how the blade is profiled, its still better at splitting than the European style. Also, Europe mainly makes American style axes now, just randomly. What you want to do is to balance out between really thin and slightly thick for a general purpose axe. I can get fancy here but I won't.

I will randomly put up a pic of a decently profiled chopping axe, just so you can see what they look like. This isn't the best out there, but it is my best.


Whats left to say goes along with what I just said (thickness of the axe) is is that when looking at a blade from the side,



the bit (the part I'm pointing at with a nail) has different shapes. Some bits are totally flat like in my first pic, which supposedly aid in chopping, but people claim then they get stuck easier in the wood. Some bits are convexed like in my second pic, which people claim don't chop as well, but don't get stuck as bad. Personally, I don't notice a difference, other than flat bits do indeed strike deeper. Last, some bits are concave at the bit, this is not recommended for general use. What this does is make a BEAUTIFUL chopping axe. Imagine the shape of a Roman Gladius Blade. Its what professional lumber jacks do to their axes in competitions, and why they get such huge chips out of trees.

Going to end here, as this is all there is too axe profiles. If you guys need reprofiling guides I can link you to a good one, because I sure as hell am not making one myself. As far as sharpening, thats a whole other topic.


Last edited by Otter on Sat Sep 24, 2011 11:48 pm; edited 3 times in total
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Re: Axe Profiling

Post by Sniper71 on Sat Sep 24, 2011 11:31 pm

Very nice article/post kyle...
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Re: Axe Profiling

Post by Otter on Sat Sep 24, 2011 11:35 pm

Ty Jim. I'm quite surprised someone even responded to this. I put up more pics as a result. Razz
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Re: Axe Profiling

Post by JSmith on Sun Sep 25, 2011 12:00 am

I'm far too intoxicated to read all those word thingys, but I like the pictures........(it took me 3 minutes to type this correctly)

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